“Theatricals” men’s tap dance shoes

Ah, tap dancing, a truly American art form.  Originally a fusion of African-American dance and some Northern Atlantic clogging and step dancing, it came into its own in the 20th century, with such famous performers as Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, Gregory Hines, and Savion Glover.  Even more recently, some musical groups like Tilly and the Wall used tapping instead of drums in their songs, to very interesting effect!  These shoes are lace-up black Oxford-style tap shoes, probably from the 1980’s, and made by the “Theatricals” company.  These particular shoes have not had a lot of wear and still help some hoofer get in a lot of toe tapping!  Click here for views and sizing information.

 

1960’s men’s wingtip Florsheim shoes

If you like the wing tip accent on your shoes but don’t like the extra flash of the black and white or brown and white variety, we present these reddish-brown leather wingtips with brass buckle accent to the top and side.    They’re made by Florsheim, still one of the most well-known shoemakers in the country, and their style would indicate they’re from the later part of the 1960’s.  It’s likely these shoes date back as far as the moon landing, Woodstock, and who knows what else?  Click here for more views and sizing information.

 

The Generic Man… be still, heart

So, I just discovered The Generic Man, which creates the most beautiful womens leather…. riding-style shoes. They look like a walk in the countryside, like horse riding and hay, like hard wood floors and a breath of old, English books and sophistication. Of course, I need these. I bought a vintage pair that looks *almost* like them last week, actually, but my mom and I couldn’t (and still can’t) decide if my shoes are for men or women. They look like mens shoes, though they seem like they’re made for women? So I’ve been hesitant to wear them at the office… but with these new beauts from The Generic Man, I think I’ll flash my Oxford “slippers” the next time the air calls for anything but flip flops.

Miss Paige