Summertime Sundress Season

The fashion designer Lilly Pulitzer is credited with popularizing the sundress in the 1960s. The sundress is characterized by lightweight fabric, usually cotton, and a flowing fit. Some of the best examples of the sundress are from the 1970s, in the prairie style. This floral frock is a beautiful shade of maroon and is in great condition!

maroon sundress
prairie sundress

Another example of the prairie style, is this brown and pale grey sundress.

vintage sundress
collectible prairie dress

The camisole top with the satin trim is quintessential 1970s and a timeless classic. Also popular in the 1970s was the full length maxi sundress. This handmade lime green dress actually has tiny white polka dots on it and is in excellent condition.

collectible 70s sundress
vintage maxi sundress

One more from the 1970s, is this simple and chic, red sundress.

70s sundress
collectible red dress

A lightweight cotton with white trim and an elastic waist, this dress is both comfortable and pretty!

Taking a step back further into the 1960s, we have this fabulous summertime shift.

collectible sundress
1960s dress

A fantastic find for the modern woman! Made of cotton and a size large. Don’t forget to accessorize when dressing in a vintage sundress. These spectacular 1950s ruffled gloves are made with striped organdy.

collectible gloves
vintage 1950s gloves

Take your summer look from mediocre to outstanding with a perfect vintage sundress and accessories!

NYFW Coverage: Rodarte does Little House on the Prairie

I think Laura (of Rodarte’s design sister duo Kate and Laura Mulleavy) must have been dreaming of another very famous Laura when she and Kate were creating their F/W 2011 line. Laura Ingalls Wilder of the beloved Little House on the Prairie television show from the 1980’s would be so proud to see floor length country dresses walking a Manhattan runway.

Inspired by the rolling farm fields of middle America and The Wizard of Oz, the siblings sent a color palette of oatmeal, wheat, cream and earth down the stage. Floor length wind-swept cinched-waist coats and lots of lace dresses were show highlights. Criss-cross, double and triple triangle flanges and keyhole cutouts decorated necklines. Almost the opposite of the high-energy, sharply colored and silhouetted New York designed woman, it’s refreshing to see softer shades, softer style lines and a little country romance.

Stills from Rodarte’s recent line followed by similar vintage wares from us.

Photo credit: honestlywtf.com