Yellow 1970’s felt beaded circle skirt

The circle skirt is widely associated with the 1950’s, when it partnered up with the poodle to make one of the most recognizable women’s styles of the twentieth century, but this style didn’t just fade away!  Oh no.   Because the circle skirt is an inherently fun cut, it is always open to re-interpretation.  That’s what we have here.  Bold colors, beading, and a freer, almost abstract design, with the potential to be worn with more “ethnic”-looking shoes and tops, or it can be part of a retro ensemble in the spirit of movies like “American Graffiti” and “Grease”.   Click here for more views and sizing information.

 

 

Early 1970’s A-line houndstooth check dress

Combining the flattering and youthful A-line cut with the ever-popular houndstooth check pattern, this fully-lined dress is a made of a wool blend and can be worn in winter, despite its mid-thigh/above the knee length.  Contrasting red and brass-tone accents give the whole dress a vaguely military efficiency, but it’s clearly of that period where it would have been worn with or without pantyhose or tights and with thick-heeled shoes, possibly with a high tongue. A-line cut is flattering on a variety of figure types while being comfortable.  Click here for more views and information.

 

Sparkling paisley late 1960’s/early 1970’s women’s jumpsuit

Paisley has a long and varied history, originating in Iran and eventually enjoying wide popularity throughout southern Asia.  More recently, the large paisley print enjoyed  popularity with the hippie and psychedelic period in the 1960’s.  And so it became a new innovation to combine metallic fabrics, such as on this jumpsuit and top, with big swooping dramatic colors.   Click here for more views of this sparkling and dramatic multi-piece set!

1970’s women’s fleece-lined leather and suede boots

 

Whether you’re wearing a wrap-around skirt or jeans or corduroys,  these two-tone suede and leather boots go with many looks.  Lined in warm fleece, these pull on to put the finishing touch on your outfit.  This style of boot was incredibly popular in the mid- to late 1970’s, almost always in warm colors and was often part of an a-line or very “together” feminine silhouette that was still casual.  Think of Pam Dawber from Mork and Mindy.  More views and sizing information available here.

All-leather 1970’s women’s blazer jacket

The very definition of comfortable, cool, and classic:  Fitted women’s blazer-style leather jacket sums up the versatility of 1970’s clothing.  This can easily be paired with corduroys or an A-line long skirt, worn with clogs or knee-high boots.  For those really committed to the 70’s look, try layering with a loose-collar turtleneck sweater.  Endless possibilities await you!  More views and information here:

 

1970’s women’s “Young Pendleton” virgin wool shirt-jac

 

From Pendleton’s misses’ line introduced in the 70’s, this shirt jacket pairs the timeless colors  of black, red, cream, and yellow with a multi-directional plaid in a decidedly feminine silhouette.  Features 70’s style “swallow’s tail” collar,  black buttons, and loops for a belt.   Made of all-virgin wool from all-Oregon sheep in the eastern part of this fair state!  Click here for more details and sizing information.

1950’s red and charcoal women’s plaid blazer

Coming straight to you from the late 1950’s, this smartly tailored and plaid-bedecked dark gray women’s blazer-style jacket packs a big color wallop while retaining an air of matter-of-factness and efficiency.   Wool fabric is complemented by leather trim at the collar, down the center front, and on the diagonal flap hip and chest pockets, as well as on the matching buttons.  Great for coordinating with pants or a skirt and appropriate for a variety of functions!  More photos and information here.

 

 

1980’s John Molloy knit women’s sweater

Cream-colored hand-knit Irish sweater by John Molloy.  Alternating patterns and textures on one classic-colored new wool background, perfect for wandering green and craggy landscapes, relaxing in a warm pub, or reading some James Joyce — or any configuration of the three.  Ribbed collar and cuffs, pullover style, and full-length sleeves.  More sizing and details available here.

1980’s designer princess gown in burgundy velvet

As splendid as it is luxurious, this never-worn and deadstock 1980’s gown by Alyce Designs of Chicago was originally sent to a Saks (as in Saks Fifth Avenue) sample sale.   The basic form is a drop-waist formal dress with puffed sleeves, sweetheart neckline, and tea-length hem:  quintessential mid-eighties.  The real beauty is in the use of fabric:  A soft velvet in a burgundy-wine color, expertly gathered down the front, at the drop waist, and best of all, at the sleeves.  The visual effect makes a lasting impression, and it likely is compounded when worn and walked in.  Click here for more sizing and views!