Mid-1960’s dotted pink on pink formal dress

 

Made here in Portland, Oregon, by Chumley for Charles F. Berg, this simple elegant dress with a layer of dotted net overlay is sure to provide plenty of spring enchantment for formal occasions.  Paired with a sleek but voluminous updo, maybe some delicately pointed shoes, this provides all the pretty in pink you need, from the faintest petal pink to more of a baby pink to the hot pink accented tied bow at the waist.  Click here for more views and sizing information.

1980’s neo-Victorian Gunne Sax dress

 

The warm weather may be coming, but maybe you like to keep your arms covered.  Maybe you like a Victorian style of clothing, but you also like the 80’s?  This is exactly what Gunne Sax has created for you, then:  A spectacular fusion of late 1800’s Victorian dress meets seaside bathing costume, incorporated into romantic early 1980’s design, padded shoulders and all.  Definitely distinctive and one-of-a-kind!  Pair it with pumps or lace-up boots, it’s your call.  Click here for more sizing and views.

K-Mart special: Floral no-sleeve spring blouse

Spring is in the air here at Monster Vintage headquarters: The blossoms are opening, the birds are migrating, and you can smell something blooming in the air.  We dream of a time when we’ll see the sun for more than fifteen minutes.  This blouse expresses that hope:  It is for short-sleeve weather.  Made for K-Mart in lightweight fabric, the print in varying intensities of red, yellow, blue, and just a little peach on white reminds us of a time in the not too far-off future when we will actually want to go outside.  In classic late 1960’s/early 1970’s style, this blouse can be loosely belted and worn with shorts, pedal pushers, and even a light A-line skirt.    Click here for fabric, sizing, and other information.

 

1940’s women’s activewear dress in light warm brown

Somewhere between “camel” and “light cinnamon” in color is this efficient, tailored shirtwaister dress.  Made for the “Tom Boy” label by a company called “American Golfer”, this dress tells a little story about what semi-activewear for women looked like in the early to mid 1940’s.  The design grants enough movement for a round of golf, but the details like the patch and flap pockets and the great deco-disc buttons make the design attractive enough to wear off the green as well.  Click here for more views and information.

 

Deadstock designer blue 1980’s gown by Alyce Designs

Combining 1980’s  love for asymmetry and royal blue, this deadstock gown by Alyce Designs is in a timeless empire cut with a sheer, diaphanous overlay of what could be called “raining roses”.   The flower motif adds tons of visual interest and glitz for the gown’s intended purpose as formalwear.  As with many of the “true” hues, royal blue looks good with several skin tones and hair colors.    Most of all, this is a unique piece and has never been owned before!  Click here for more views and sizing information.

 

1960’s/1970’s purple hot pants

There’s a song from the 1960’s that asks the question, “Who wears short shorts?”  Many a fashion-forward female from the mid-60’s through early 70’s did!  It’s hard to imagine now, but miniskirts and hot pants were completely revolutionary and scandalous when they were introduced in the mid-1960’s, riding the tide of sweeping social change along with see-through dresses made of vinyl, disposable paper fashion, and swimsuits that happened to be missing the top.  Mary Quant, who gave us the miniskirt, is credited with designing early hot pants.  The style of these very short shorts went through its own evolution – at first, they weren’t as short as they would eventually get, and the fabrics changed over time.  A pair of hot pants like these, made of leather, in a bright hue of purple, and with conspicuous white contrasting stitches would most likely be paired with white knee boots, although a big-soled shoe would not be out of the question.  Emphasizing the smallness and youthfulness of the body was the name of the game!   Click here for more views and sizing information.

 

Colorful poncho with eagle/thunderbird motif

The poncho:  An ancient yet ever-recurring clothing trend of Central and South America.  There are several variants on the idea, but the genius of the design is simplicity plus functionality.  Some ponchos are worn with the points down in the center front and back, but this is worn as a rectangular shape and covers more of you from the elements.  With accents of red, maroon, and yellow against black, white, and gray, this can be worn with a variety of colors and styles.   Click here for more views and sizing information.

 

1970’s women’s terrycloth jumpsuit

Celebrate freedom of movement in a soft, figure-hugging, very seventies jumpsuit in beige and black.  Pair with wedge shoes to extend the vertical line of this garment and accessorize with the belt , some hoop earrings, or any other fun accessory of your choice.  Like many garments of the seventies, this is an easy-on, easy-off and washable piece.  Click here for more views and sizing information!

 

Red and white hearts and flowers apron

Whoever said that something is “not all hearts and flowers” clearly had not seen this light, airy, and very Valentine-y apron.  We here at Monster Vintage think this is just perfect for entertaining for the most famous February holiday or just anytime you want to look great while serving cookies or cupcakes!  Click here for more views and information.

 

1940’s beaded crepe cocktail dress with peplum

The 1940’s were remarkable for many reasons, but this dress tells a great story about why that is.  During the second World War, fabrics were rationed for the war effort and the cut of women’s dresses reflected this:  Skirts were not full, very few ruffles and frills were used, and women were encouraged to spruce up the same dress with scarves, pins, and other accessories.  One fabric extravagance that could be found was the peplum, and so it is with this dress by “Champagne” of New York:  Its very simple silhouette is not very different from the everyday cut, and yet it is clearly a sophisticated garment for a night of celebration.  This message is clearly communicated by the decorative beading at the collar, the slyly asymmetrical gathering and bow fashioned of the precious “extra” crepe-like fabric, the dramatically padded shoulders, and by the contrast between the matte black of the dress itself and the light sparkling off the beads.  Click here for more views and sizing.